Canning Vegetable Broth or Stock

Two quart jars of homemade vegetable broth

How to Can Vegetable Broth

 

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There is really nothing easier to can with your pressure canner than homemade vegetable broth or stock. I love to can homemade chicken broth too, but vegetable broth is even easier to make and can.

 

You can store homemade vegetable broth in several ways. If you don’t want to can it, you can also freeze vegetable broth in containers like these inexpensive freezer containers from Amazon. If you want to try canning your vegetable broth, you will need to use a pressure canner. Vegetable broth is not safe to can in a water bath canner.

 

There really are no rules for making vegetable broth. Some people save all of their vegetable scraps (carrot tops, carrot skins, onion skins, celery leaves, etc.) and place them in a freezer ziploc bag in the freezer until they are ready to make their vegetable broth. There are no certain amounts of vegetables you need to put in your broth, but here are some guidelines.

 

Quart jar of homemade vegetable broth

 

Vegetable Broth Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 6-8 carrots
  • 6 celery stalks
  • 3-4 medium onions, quartered
  • 3 cloves garlic

 

There is no need to peel the carrots, just scrub them to get the dirt off of them and cut them into small pieces. There’s no need to cut the leaves off of the celery. Cut the celery into small pieces. You can throw the onion skins in with the onions quarters.

 

Cook your vegetable broth either in a large stock pot on the stove, or in a large electric roasting pan. I like to use my electric roasting pan that I use to cook my turkeys. I just place all of the vegetables in the roasting pan and fill the roasting pan about half full of water.

 

Simmer the broth for at least several hours. You can even let it simmer over low heat overnight. That’s one of the benefits of using the roasting pan.

 

I don’t use exact measurements when preparing this recipe, but when I fill my roasting pan half full of water, this makes enough vegetable broth to fill about 7 quart jars of vegetable broth.

 

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How to Pressure Can Vegetable Stock

 

When you are ready to can the vegetable broth, wash and sterilize 7 quart canning jars. I sterilize my canning jars by running them through a quick rinse in the dishwasher.

 

Place 1-2 inches of water in your pressure canner and place the canner on the stove to heat the water.

 

Pour the vegetable broth into your sterilized canning jars, leaving 1 inch head space. You can easily measure the headspace with this inexpensive canning funnel.

 

You don’t have to, but you may want to pour the broth through a fine mesh sieve in order to remove any vegetable pieces.

 

Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp kitchen towel or paper towel and place the canning jar lids and rings on the jars finger tight.

 

Place the jars in the canner and secure the lid on the pressure canner. Heat the water in the canner and vent the canner by letting steam escape steadily through the vent for 10 minutes. Close the vent and allow the canner to build pressure.

 

For pint jars process at 10 lb pressure for 30 minutes, for quart jars process for 35 minutes. Processing time is for altitudes up to 1,000 ft. These instructions are for a dial gauge canner, not a weighted canner.

 

When the processing time is complete, turn off the heat on the stove and let the canner sit until the pressure is completely released from the vent. To prevent liquid siphoning from the canning jars, loosen the lid of the canner and leave the lid on the canner for about 10 minutes.

 

Remove the lid from the pan and let the jars sit for another 10 minutes before removing them from the canner.

 

Place the jars on a towel on the kitchen counter to cool. Do not disturb for 24 hours. Check the lids to see if they have sealed. If you have any jars that did not seal, place them in the refrigerator or freeze them. Jars that sealed can be stored in the pantry for 1-2 years.

 

Follow my canning and preserving board on Pinterest.

 

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Two quart jars of homemade vegetable broth

 

 

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