Canning Bean and Ham Soup

How to can homemade bean and ham soup. Step by step pressure canning for beginners.

How to Can Bean and Ham Soup

 

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I love bean and ham soup. I mean, who doesn’t!? It was one of my favorite Campbell’s soups when I was a kid. When I got my first taste of homemade bean and ham soup, I was hooked. It is the best! You will love this recipe for canning bean and ham soup. It is one of my favorite pressure canning soup recipes.

 

Bean and ham soup is one of the easiest soups to pressure can. You don’t even have to cook the beans ahead of time. All of the ingredients go in the jar raw, and then they cook during the canning process.

 

You will need a pressure canner to prepare this recipe. It is not safe to can beans with a boiling water canner.

 

Step by Step Canning Video

 

New to pressure canning? This video shows me preparing this recipe step by step.

 

 

 

Bean and Ham Soup Canning Recipe

Ingredients (per quart jar):

3/4 c. dried white beans
3 tbsp. chopped ham
1 tbsp. chopped onion
1 tbsp. chopped carrot
3 tsp. chopped celery
2 tsp. chicken bouillon
1/4 tsp. salt or liquid smoke

 

Rinse beans. Place 3/4 c. dried beans in each jar. Add remaining ingredients.

 

Easy recipe for canning bean and ham soup.

 

Canning Instructions

 

Fill the remainder of the jars with boiling water, leaving 1 inch head space. Wipe rims of jars with a clean dish towel and place lids and rings on jars.

 

Process jars in pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure for 75 minutes for pints and 90 minutes for quarts. Remove jars from canner and let cool until lids seal.

 

Yield: Varies

 

Related Pressure Canning Recipes

 

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How to can homemade bean and ham soup. Step by step pressure canning for beginners.

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28 Comments on "Canning Bean and Ham Soup"


  1. Canned 3 qts. Had our first one last night! Husband said it was the best canned bean soup he’s ever eaten! Looks like I will be canning more.

    (1/5)
    Reply

  2. Well, today I worked with the recipe all day long. 20 quarts so far. I need to do another couple of batches tomorrow. (Using up some northern beans.) I made one change. I added a bay leaf to each jar. I love congressional soup and that is really the only change I could spot. The recipe worked fabulous and my house smells amazing. Just a side note. Old beans don’t work as well. (Of course!) I mean, they worked but I have a feeling I will need to cook those beans a little longer once opening them. I had one jar not seal. Im dying to try it but just too tired to getting around to warm it back up. Ha! I mean 20 jars! It was super easy to make but pressure canning them took FOREVER! Thanks so much for the canning recipe!!

    (5/5)
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  3. I used leftover Thanksgiving ham to can several quarts. We opened the first quart today, and it did not disappoint! Very tasty, and so easy to can! We typically only eat ham for the holidays, but I may be buying more just for the soup!! Thank you for the delicious recipe!

    (5/5)
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    1. Yes, you wouldn’t need to increase the processing time. Just be careful not to overfill the jars. The beans expand quite a bit during processing.

      (5/5)
      Reply

  4. I really like your site. I have my jars of ham and bean soup teady for the canner now. First time i have ever done anything besides tomatoes, green beans, peas and peaches. Excited to see how they come out!

    (5/5)
    Reply

  5. Hi again!
    Can you use actual chicken broth on place of the bullion in this recipe? I too love bean soup and so does my family! I so agree with Sisan Pesch. Another win-win in the recipe column! Thanks again!

    (4/5)
    Reply

    1. In your ham and bean recipe can you use ham or chicken broth instead of chicken Bouillon.

      (5/5)
      Reply

  6. I canned my already cooked bean soup but in the processing it over cooked the beans but still eatable , did not think to just add the dry ingrediants, will do next time.

    (1/5)
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    1. I also can a lot. Learn by trial and error. Got a salty ham, on sale. One recipe I cooked the beans as instructed, NOT THIS SITE, and when all was said and done it tasted good but I do not like mushy bean soup, it had that refried bean texture. Next I tried soaking beans to remove skins. partial worked on skins but my bean soup turned out 5 star. I do not mind skins, more nutrient rich, been going to this recipe since!! Great job.

      (1/5)
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  7. Thank you for your web site. I am new to canning but wish to food we like to eat. Your page was a big hit. Thank you again.

    (5/5)
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  8. Recipe notes 10lbs pressure. My altitude is in 15lbs pressure. Is this not a recipe altitude variant?

    (1/5)
    Reply

  9. Sounds great, I think I’ll try this tonight. I’ve presupposed a four star rating
    It’s my understanding that adding dried spices to canning recipes won’t affect their success. Is that your experience, too? I’m just thinking some mild chili or chipotle powder might be interesting in this….

    (4/5)
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  10. This looks like a great recipe, I do have a question though. Are the measurements for a quart or pint jar?

    Thanks Paul

    (5/5)
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  11. Can I use the ham broth I made cooking down the ham bone in place of the water or the chicken bouillon?

    (1/5)
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  12. Do you not soak the beans first??? I am used to canning with beans that have already been soaked or expanded??? Thanks

    (5/5)
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    1. Hi! Nope, no soaking the beans for this recipe. It is SO EASY. The fact that the beans will expand is compensated for in this recipe. It just depends on the recipe!

      (5/5)
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  13. I have several canning books and of course there is the internet, but I love your site the most. Seems like your recipe selections are the ones I want to can and the recipes themselves include ingredients I want to use. I am so glad I found Creativehomemaking.com.Thank you! Sue

    Reply

    1. Hi! You can’t use the instant pot to can the broth, but you can use it to cook the broth then preserve in a pressure canner.

      Reply

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