Canning Dry Beans

Recipe and instructions for canning dry beans with a pressure canner.

Did you know that it is possible to can dry beans? You can buy large quantities of dry beans very inexpensively and store them in five-gallon buckets. Beans are easy to store if you are interested in food storage.

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Storing dry beans in large containers is just one way of preserving them. If you can them, they are already cooked and ready to put into your favorite recipes, like chili or refried beans. You can use this recipe to can any type of beans, such as kidney beans, black beans, white beans, chick peas, pinto beans, etc.

 

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How to Can Beans

 

Ingredients:

  • Dried beans
  • Water

 

Two ingredients!? That’s right. This recipe takes a little time waiting for the beans to soak, but it is really easy to prepare, with only two ingredients!

 

You can use quart or pint sized jars to can the beans. You will need to plan on approximately 3/4 c. dried beans for each quart sized jar, or a little more than 1/4 c. per pint sized jar. I always make a little extra, just in case.

 

Sort through the beans and make sure there’s not anything in there that shouldn’t be in there. Place them in a large stock pot and cover with water. Let the pan sit overnight.

 

By morning the beans will have soaked up all the liquid. Pour out any remaining liquid and put new water in the pan, covering the beans with 2 inches of water on top of the beans.

 

Bring the beans to a boil, and simmer for 30 minutes. Stir frequently to prevent sticking.

 

Canning Instructions

 

Ladle hot beans into sterilized canning jars, leaving 1 inch head space. You can easily measure the headspace with this inexpensive canning funnel.

 

Fill the jars with the cooking liquid, adding extra hot water if necessary, leaving 1 inch head space.

 

Wipe rims of jars with a damp paper towel or dish towel and place sterilized lids and rings on jars.

 

Process in a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure for 75 minutes for pints or 90 minutes for quarts.

 

Remove jars from pressure canner and let them sit until completely cooled. Check to make sure jars are sealed. Place any unsealed jars in the refrigerator to use right away. Sealed jars can be stored in a cool, dark area for 1-2 years.

 

Yield: Varies

 

Like this recipe? Try my recipes for canning chilibean and ham soup, or for canning chick peas.

 

Follow my Favorite Recipes and Canning and Preserving boards on Pinterest.

Recipe and instructions for canning dry beans with a pressure canner.

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4 Comments on "Canning Dry Beans"


  1. Thank you so much for posting this. It definitely is better to eat home canned foods, as we can control what goes into them, such as sodium, additives, BPA’s, etc. I do, however, have one suggestion. It’s important to include reminders about wait time for after the heat is turned off to the pressure canner. If you remove the jars before it normalizes, the jars can crack or the liquid can be sucked out of the jars and ruin the batch. Just thought I’d mention it, so that we don’t get ahead of ourselves and mess up our batches. Thanks.

    (4/5)
    Reply

  2. Thanks for taking the time to do all of these canning recipes. It really helps to be able to pull it up on the computer.

    Reply

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